Love Your Kitchen, Love Your Family Remodel

Love Your Kitchen, Love Your Family Remodel

Join us for a chance to tour this beautiful kitchen remodel in Ballard

May 5, 2019 on the the Northwest Green Home Tour! 

This family was unhappy with the layout of their existing kitchen. They needed a new kitchen that encouraged social cooking within the family, better storage solutions, and more counter top space. The goal of the project was to create a space where, while one person cooks, the other can occupy the same space to keep each other company.

Through the collaborative efforts of Entero Design and Mighty House Construction, we worked within the existing footprint of their kitchen to create a space that fit their design aesthetic and their personal needs. Entero Design worked with the clients to develop a kitchen layout that encouraged socialization between the couple and incorporated a variety of sustainable finishes and materials to make the space unique. To gain more kitchen space, the unconditioned back porch was enclosed and incorporated into the kitchen space, enlarging the kitchen by a few feet.

 

Mighty House Construction handled the construction process for the project. We were able to keep the pre-existing exterior stairs and reuse the interior kitchen doors. The old flooring was replaced with Marmoleum, a natural linoleum made from linseed oil and mixed with other natural products on a jute backing. The new counter tops are made from Paperstone, a solid surface counter top made from recycled paper, and the newly installed cabinets are from Canyon Creek, a local cabinet company in Monroe, WA whose wood products are Carb2 compliant. The beautiful new back-splash features Bedrock Recycled Glass tile made in Seattle from 100% recycled glass product. The space also features newly installed LED overhead lighting, and under-cabinet lighting from  Northwest LED.

Phinney Kitchen Remodel

Phinney Kitchen Remodel

A few years back, the owners of this Phinney Ridge home completed a fantastic addition that, however, left the old kitchen untouched, leaving it cut off from the dining room. Mighty House Construction, with the help of Entero Design, just completed this beautiful remodel that opened up the space without changing the original footprint of the kitchen. Now, the flow between the dining room and kitchen is expansive, inviting, and much more practical.

The kitchen includes cabinetry by Canyon Creek Cabinet Company that is notably low-VOC and locally made. Beautiful, man-made, quartz countertops that are heat-resistant and non-porous from Cambira were installed. The kitchen also includes custom, wood feature pieces created from salvaged wood. The flooring of the kitchen was finished with tile and was installed throughout the kitchen and the dining room.

More photos pf this beautiful kitchen remodel found here

Resilience and Sustainability Through Pocket Neighborhoods

Resilience and Sustainability Through Pocket Neighborhoods

The term pocket neighborhood sometimes referred to as “bungalow courts” or “cottage clusters,” was first coined by Ross Chapin of Ross Chapin ArchitectsPocket neighborhoods tend to consist of about 12 homes that all face a common area that residents must walk through to access their front door.  

Creating small homes on small lots allows more compact development, which uses land efficiently and can offer greater access to amenities. 

 

Pocket communities really took off in the Pacific Northwest in collaboration with developers and builders, including The Cottage Company in Seattle, Triad Associates in Kirkland, and Artisan Fine Homebuilding. Third Street Cottages in Seattle, is a community of eight detached cottages located on four standard single-family lots. To help this vision come to life, the municipality adopted an innovative Cottage Housing Development (CHD) zoning code. The code allows for up to double the density of detached homes in all single-family zones.  

Pocket communities also serve as a great solution for increasing the number of affordable units within a municipality. Creating small homes on small lots allows more compact development, which uses land efficiently and can offer greater access to amenities. Residents may also enjoy a smaller mortgage, with the option to enhance their home by selecting higher-end finishes. Then there’s the increasing value of these small homes. The Third Street Cottages, the first of the pocket neighborhoods, have resold for as much as 250 percent of their original price, proving their enduring appeal and value.

Small homes feed our recent fascination with resilience and sustainability because they meet the needs of communities that wish to increase density and reform land use patterns without losing the feel of a single-family community. Smaller homes also can reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions through the use of passive solar energy, low water-use fixtures, and the abundance of vegetation in these communities found in the interior courtyard, personal gardens and surrounding open space. Additionally, the demographic shift toward smaller households and the rise in single-person households is driving a need for a more diverse housing stock that includes small homes.

Green Pathways Provides Opportunities in Social Justice

Green Pathways Provides Opportunities in Social Justice

Got Green’s Young Leaders in the Green Movement steering committee won a resolution in 2015 to create 100 living wage green internships for low income young workers of color in Seattle. Since then, they have expanded to nonprofit and private environmental employers through the inception of the Green Pathways Fellowship Program.

The Green Pathways Fellowship Program was created through a partnership between Got Green and Rainier Valley Corps to provide opportunities in the green sector for low-income young adults in living wage entry-level positions in the environmental justice movement. With the City Council Approval of the 2019-2020 Seattle City Budget, Green Pathways Fellowship will be receiving $100,000 in 2019 and $164,000 in 2020.

If you are a community-based organization and may be interested in hosting a fellow, please visit this page. Or if you know someone who would be a great fit for this program, please recommend an applicant here.

Green Lake Kitchen + Bathroom Transformation

Green Lake Kitchen + Bathroom Transformation

This Green Lake Tudor home was in desperate need of some updates. The kitchen and two bathrooms were severely lacking in function and style – making it hard for Steve to live happily in these heavy uses spaces. Team Mighty House to the rescue!

BEFORE:

old kitchen cabinets and stove

AFTER:

Canyon Creek’s Katana line of cabinetry and Ceasarstone countertops provide an entirely refreshed look for the kitchen, while also maintaining its classic aesthetic. The cabinets are locally manufactured, and both companies provide products with zero VOCs (volatile organic compounds).

BEFORE:

AFTER:

bathroom is dark with bright blue toilet and shower 

Cutting the shower wall down to half-height and adding a glass enclosure, gave the upstairs bathroom a huge boost in natural lighting. Colorful tile accents and a bright blue marmoleum floor, gave the space a new feel while also maintaining some of the original room’s pop of color. Marmoleum is a natural linoleum, that is durable, resistant to bacteria, and free of toxic byproducts.  Plus, this custom tile work was done in house by our resident Mighty House tile expert!

 

Another important element of maintaining the classic Tudor charm, was working with what we already had. Updating, reusing, and salvaging existing elements is also a great way to cut down on waste and extend the life of those items and save them from the landfill. In the first floor bathroom, we left the tub and checkered floor in place and found updated finishes to match. The vanity countertop material is also salvaged PaperStone, a material made from compressed recycled paper.

old shower with yellow walls new bath and shower with white tile

What kind of updates does your house need? Let us know and check out more images in our Flikr gallery.